recent arrivals

This is the first post in my Recent Arrivals feature, which will highlight new books that I have purchased and/or have been published by colleagues.

World Without Us

The World Without Us, by Alan Weisman

From the publisher: “Alan Weisman writes about which objects from today would vanish without us; how our pipes, wires, and cables would be pulverized into an unusual (but mere) line of red rock; why some museums and churches might be the last human creations standing; how rats and roaches would struggle without us; and how plastic, cast-iron, and radio waves may be our most lasting gifts to the planet.”

Twinkie

Twinkie, Deconstructed: My Journey to Discover how the Ingredients Found in Processed Foods are Grown, Mined (Yes, Mined), and Manipulated into What America Eats, by Steve Ettlinger

From the publisher: “From the phosphate mines in Idaho to the corn fields in Iowa, from gypsum mines in Oklahoma to the vanilla harvest in Madagascar, Twinkie, Deconstructed is a fascinating, thoroughly researched romp of a narrative that demystifies some of the most common processed food ingredients—where they come from, how they are made, how they are used—and why. Beginning at the source (hint: they’re often more closely linked to rock and petroleum than any of the four food groups), we follow each Twinkie ingredient through the process of being crushed, baked, fermented, refined, and/or reacted into a totally unrecognizable goo or powder with a strange name—all for the sake of creating a simple snack cake.”

Using Blogs to Enhance Literacy: The Next Powerful Step in 21st Century LearningUsing Blogs to Enhance Literacy: The Next Powerful Step in 21st Century Learning, by Diane Penrod (colleague at Rowan)

From the publisher: “Beyond the mainstream media hype about the dangers of adolescents and blogs, we find that young people are developing 21st century literacies especially in information and visual literacy. In this book, Diane Penrod addresses the social, developmental, and pedagogical issues surrounding the use of blogs and the implications that blogging has for current and future students.”

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