tfw fall 2011 daily homework

About Homework Assignments

The assignments that are listed on this page are to be completed before class starts the day they are due. The latest assignment will be placed at the top to reduce scrolling.

For Thursday, December 8

Please read Gee, “Semiotic Domains: Is Playing Video Games a Waste of Time?” which is available on the Readings page.

Read the Terms of Service and Conditions of Use statements for the site you are researching. Often these are links at the bottom of the page in small font. You may need to log out to see the links as, in with Twitter, when you are logged in enless scrolling could be enabled). As you read, think about the questions: What are your rights as a user? What do you own? What does the site own? What can the site do with the content you upload?

For Tuesday, December 6

Please read, watch, and listen to the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 4.

For Thursday, December 1

Please read and watch the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 3.

Work on your Web 2.0 research. Email your excel spreadsheet to BW by 11:00pm Wednesday, November 30.

For Tuesday, November 29

Please read and interact with the texts in Web 2.0 Readings Part 2, which are available on the Readings page.

For Tuesday, November 22

Please read and watch the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 1 (1945 – 1996). This set of readings (and the ones in Part 2 and Part 3) will be the most amount of readings that we have for homework for the module. They are accessible via the Readings page.

To get us thinking about Twitter, watch the below video:

And read David Silver’s short but very important, “The Difference between Thin and Thick Tweets.”

The Tumblr assignment begins this week. So, get started on that. Looking forward to your posts!

For Thursday, November 17

Please read Winsor, D. (1992). “What Counts as Writing? An Argument from Engineers’ Practice,” which is available on the Readings page, and watch “This is How We Dream” parts 1 and 2, a presentation by Richard Miller from Rutgers University:

.

In response to these texts, I’d like to post a video or image to the module Tumblr blog that you find online that relates to the arguments that Winsor and/or Miller are making. In your post, discuss in no more than 3 sentences why you have chosen the video or image. Note that the full Tumblr assignment begins next week.

In order to successfully comment on your peer’s Tumblr posts, you’ll need an account with Disqus. Create an account and when you attempting to comment, sign in using your Disqus account and not any of the other options that they give. Part student experience shows this the most effective way to successfully comment.

For Tuesday, November 15 (First Module 3 Assignment)

Please download, print, and read the module syllabus (.pdf), which is available on the syllabus page, and read Computer Classroom Etiquette. Come to class with any questions you may have.

Go to Tumblr and create a free account (unless you already have one). For the URL section, this is going to be the web address for your own personal Tumblr account. For example, I entered billwolff and my personal Tumblr blog is http://billwolff.tumblr.com. Create a similarly professional name. Come to class knowing the email address you used to create the account.

Please first read Axelrod and Cooper’s “Strategies for Reading Critically” and use the annotation techniques they describe when you read Rettberg (2008) “What is a Blog?” I will check the copies of your readings in class to see how you have annotated the texts. All readings are linked off the password protected Readings page unless available for free online. Please also read Bolter (2001) “Writing in the Late Age of Print” and bring a digital copy of a response to the texts in which you consider the following:

One of Bolter’s many goals in this chapter is to shift the reader’s focus away from binary arguments about the future of books and writing. He’s not interested in yes/no debates about whether or not this or that will fail. They are too simple and tend to lead down rather tiresome paths. Rather, he is interested in implications and nuances, which is what he is searching for when he writes, “The question is whether alphabetic texts can compete effectively with the visual and aural sensorium that surrounds us. And if prose itself is being forced to renegotiate its cultural role, then the printed book is doubly challenged” (p. 6). Consider what Bolter and Rettberg discuss, as well as your experiences as writers and readers, I’d like you to consider the questions Bolter raises here. Can alphabetic text compete with visual and aural? Is alphabetic text on the screen the same as text on a printed page? What is the role of culture in any change that is taking place?

Your response should be equal to 2/3rds of a page, single space, Times New Roman font size 12. We will post these responses to Tumblr in class, so be sure you have access to a digital copy.

For Thursday, November 10

Please read Gee, “Semiotic Domains: Is Playing Video Games a Waste of Time?” which is available on the Readings page.

Read the Terms of Service and Conditions of Use statements for the site you are researching Often these are links at the bottom of the page in small font. You may need to log out to see the links as, in with Twitter, when you are logged in enless scrolling could be enabled). As you read, think about the questions: What are your rights as a user? What do you own? What does the site own? What can the site do with the content you upload?

For Thursday, October 27

Please read and watch the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 4.

For Tuesday, October 25

Please read and watch the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 3.

Work on your Web 2.0 research. Email your excel spreadsheet to BW by 11:00pm Monday, October 24.

For Thursday, October 20

Start tweeting as discussed in the assignment. Continue Tumbling. Be sure to tweet your Tumblr posts.

Please read and watch the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 2.

Work on your Web 2.0 research. Email your excel spreadsheet to BW by 11:00pm Monday, October 24.

For Tuesday, October 18

Please read and watch the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 1 (1945 – 1996). This set of readings (and the ones in Part 2 and Part 3) will be the most amount of readings that we have for homework for the module. They are accessible via the Readings page.

The Tumblr assignment begins this week. So, get started on that. Looking forward to them!

You may also want to get a head-start on interacting, reading, and watching the texts in Parts 2 or 3 of the Web 2.0 Readings, which will be due the On Thursday the 20th and Tuesday the 25th.

For Thursday, October 13

Please read Winsor, D. (1992). What Counts as Writing? An Argument from Engineers’ Practice, which is available on the Readings page, and watch “This is How We Dream” parts 1 and 2, a presentation by Richard Miller from Rutgers University:

.

To get us thinking about Twitter, watch the below video:

And read David Silver’s short but very important, “The Difference between Thin and Thick Tweets.”

In response to these texts, I’d like to post a video or image to the module Tumblr blog that you find online that relates to the arguments that Winsor and/or Miller are making. In your post, discuss in no more than 3 sentences why you have chosen the video or image. Note that the full Tumblr assignment begins next week.

For Tuesday, October 11 (First Module 2 Assignment)

Update: Dr. Tweedie told me that he said to follow this homework, which is spot-on. You’ll see below that you need a password to access the readings. To get the password, go to my section of the course Blackboard site and click on the link for the homework for today. The password is there.

Please download, print, and read the module syllabus (.pdf), which is available on the syllabus page, and read Computer Classroom Etiquette. Come to class with any questions you may have.

Go to Tumblr and create a free account (unless you already have one). For the URL section, this is going to be the web address for your own personal Tumblr account. For example, I entered billwolff and my personal Tumblr blog is http://billwolff.tumblr.com. Create a similarly professional name. Come to class knowing the email address you used to create the account.

Please first read Axelrod and Cooper’s “Strategies for Reading Critically” and use the annotation techniques they describe when you read Rettberg (2008) “What is a Blog?” I will check the copies of your readings in class to see how you have annotated the texts. All readings are linked off the password protected Readings page unless available for free online. Please also read Bolter (2001) “Writing in the Late Age of Print” (pp 1 – 13) and bring a digital copy of a response to the texts in which you consider the following:

One of Bolter’s many goals in this chapter is to shift the reader’s focus away from binary arguments about the future of books and writing. He’s not interested in yes/no debates about whether or not this or that will fail. They are too simple and tend to lead down rather tiresome paths. Rather, he is interested in implications and nuances, which is what he is searching for when he writes, “The question is whether alphabetic texts can compete effectively with the visual and aural sensorium that surrounds us. And if prose itself is being forced to renegotiate its cultural role, then the printed book is doubly challenged” (p. 6). Consider what Bolter and Rettberg discuss, as well as your experiences as writers and readers, I’d like you to consider the questions Bolter raises here. Can alphabetic text compete with visual and aural? Is alphabetic text on the screen the same as text on a printed page? What is the role of culture in any change that is taking place?

Your response should be equal to 2/3rds of a page, single space, Times New Roman font size 12. We will post these responses to Tumblr in class, so be sure you have access to a digital copy.

For Thursday, October 6

Please read Gee, “Semiotic Domains: Is Playing Video Games a Waste of Time?” which is available on the Readings page.

For Tuesday,October 4

Please read and watch the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 4.

For Tuesday, Sept 27

Start tweeting as discussed in the assignment. Continue Tumbling. Be sure to tweet your Tumblr posts.

Please read and watch the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 3.

Work on your Web 2.0 research. Email your excel spreadsheet to BW by 11:00pm Monday, September 26.

For Thursday, Sept 22

Please read, watch, or interact with the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 2.

To get us thinking about Twitter, watch the below video:

And read David Silver’s short but very important, “The Difference between Thin and Thick Tweets.”

Post to the Tumblr blog as discussed in the Tumblr assignment.

For Tuesday, Sept 20

Update: 9/17/2011, 9:45am
Please read and watch the texts of the Web 2.0 Readings, Part 1 (1945 – 1996). This set of readings (and the ones in Part 2 and Part 3) will be the most amount of readings that we have for homework for the module. They are accessible via the Readings page.

As with your last homework, I’d like you to post a video or image to the module Tumblr blog that you find online that relates to the discussions in the Web 2.0 readings. In your post, discuss in no more than 3 sentences why you have chosen the video or image.

You may also want to get a head-start on interacting, reading, and watching the texts in Parts 2 or 3 of the Web 2.0 Readings, which will be due the On Thursday the 22nd and Tuesday the 27th.

For Thursday, Sept 15

Please read: Winsor, D. (1992). What Counts as Writing? An Argument from Engineers’ Practice, which is available on the Readings page, and watch “This is How We Dream” parts 1 and 2, a presentation by Richard Miller from Rutgers University:

In response to these texts, I’d like to post a video or image that you find online that relates to the arguments that Winsor and/or Miller are making. In your post, discuss in no more than 3 sentences why you have chose the video or image.

Update: For those of you who were not able to read all of Bolter, the PDF is now online on the password protected Readings page.

For Tuesday, Sept 13

Please download, print, and read the module syllabus (.pdf), which is available on the syllabus page, and read Computer Classroom Etiquette. Come to class with any questions you may have.

Please first read Axelrod and Cooper’s “Strategies for Reading Critically” and use the annotation techniques they describe when you read Rettberg (2008) “What is a Blog?” I will check the copies of your readings in class to see how you have annotated the texts. All readings are linked off the password protected Readings page unless available for free online. If you need the password, send me an email requesting it. Please also read Bolter (2001) “Writing in the Late Age of Print” (pp 1 – 13) and bring a digital copy of a response to the texts in which you consider the following:

One of Bolter’s many goals in this chapter is to shift the reader’s focus away from binary arguments about the future of books and writing. He’s not interested in yes/no debates about whether or not this or that will fail. They are too simple and tend to lead down rather tiresome paths. Rather, he is interested in implications and nuances, which is what he is searching for when he writes, “The question is whether alphabetic texts can compete effectively with the visual and aural sensorium that surrounds us. And if prose itself is being forced to renegotiate its cultural role, then the printed book is doubly challenged” (p. 6). Consider what Bolter and Rettberg discuss, as well as your experiences as writers and readers, I’d like you to consider the questions Bolter raises here. Can alphabetic text compete with visual and aural? Is alphabetic text on the screen the same as text on a printed page? What is the role of culture in any change that is taking place?

Your response should be equal to 2/3rds of a page, single space, Times New Roman font size 12. We will post these responses to Tumblr in class, so be sure you have access to a digital copy.

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