tfw spring 2013 daily homework

About Homework Assignments

The assignments that are listed on this page are to be completed before class starts the day they are due. The latest assignment will be placed at the top to reduce scrolling.

For Tuesday, April 30

Please watch and read the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings (Part 5: privacy).

Please complete the first part of the Portfolio assignment: create the folder stucture and come to class ready to share it with BW.

The rough draft of your final project is due by class time. Please put a copy of your draft narrative and slides in your Intro to Writing Arts Dropbox folder. This will allow you to access it in class. It is vital that the draft is finished by class time as we will be working on editing it in class.

If you have questions, please let me know.

For Thursday, April 25

Please read the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings (Part 4: gaming, screen literacy, remix).

For Tuesday, April 23

Please watch and interact with the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings (Part 3: 2006 – 2011). Continue blogging and tweeting. Start the part 2 of the Twitter assignment.

As part of our readings on our connections to Web 2.0, I would like you to stop using Facebook until after class Thursday, April 25. That is, you are not allowed to log in to or interact with anyone on Facebook for one whole week. You do not need to delete your account, though it is fascinating what happens when you try to do so. So your friends don’t freak out, your last status update should read something like, “Quitting Facebook for a week as a class experiment” or something like that. Of course, you can just stop using it and see what the results are, as well. After your last update, you must log out.

If you do not have a Facebook account, I would like you to stop using another online space that you use often or stop using another technology that you regularly use (such as, text messaging). Twitter is not an option for quitting since we are using it for class. Talk with me after class about which you will stop using.

As a way to collaboratively record and share what we are thinking about being without Facebook, I’d like you to tweet whenever you think about going to Facebook (or that other technology) and tweet what you are thinking/feeling. @reply to each other as often as possible. Add the #tfws13 hashtag to all these tweets.

Compose one blog post in which you discuss what it has been like to be without Facebook (or the other technology). How has it impacted you as an individual? As a member of a group of friends? As a student? And so on. Also think about it in terms of who you are as a professional. This post will take the place of one of your required weekly posts. It is due any time during the week of April 22.

Note: this assignment is adapted from one originated by @academicdave.

For Thursday, April 18

Please the read the essays listed under Web 2.0 Readings (Part 2: 1999 – 2005). For the essay by Selfe, read only pages 10 – 15 under the heading, “What is Technological Literacy?” Be prepared to discuss these readings and the ones for Tuesday in terms of themes that run through them.

Continue blogging and begin the Twitter assignment. If you are unsure of what to do when live-tweeting, I encourage you to see the tweets that students in #inarchs13 are tweeting. Use these as an example.

For Tuesday, April 16

Please the read the essays listed under Web 2.0 Readings (Part 1: 1945 – 1996).

For “As We May Think” by V. Bush, only read the Introduction and sections 1, 3, 6, 7, and 8. This is a complex piece. Pay close attention to how Bush is discussing the central problem of the day (the day being 1945)—how to handle the huge amounts of information now available—and his solution in the Mimex. Here is a diagram of the Mimex, which was published in Life magazine soon after the Atlantic Monthly article appeared:

There is no set prompt to respond to the readings. Rather, begin blogging about the readings as discussed in the Blogging assignment.

Please also read an essay by Atwood and a blog post by Silver, which discuss Twitter. We’ll be starting to use Twitter on Tuesday. All readings on the Readings page.

For Thursday, April 11

Please spend some time looking around the Dashboard of your brand new exciting wonderful totally cool group blog. (That is, if we’ve gotten them set up that far in class on Tuesday.)

Then, read the two essays by Bolter (see the Readings page) and compose a 400 – 500 word response to it in which you are sure to quote the text and connect Bolter’s ideas on writing and writing technologies to something in your own lives.

Please bring a copy in electronic form to class. You can email it to yourself, put it on a USB drive, or other way of having it digitally. No need to print it out or send it to BW. This response will become your first blog post.

Please also read the blog post by VanFlossen (see Readings page) discussing the difference between WordPress blog categories and tags.

For Tuesday, April 9 | First Day of Module 3

The assignment for the first meeting of the module will start us thinking about the main goal of the module: considering how the writing and social connections afforded by Web 2.0 technologies are transforming our understanding of a host of important social, political, economic, and rhetorical issues. Please read Rosen (2012) (on the Readings page) and watch this video:

Michael Wesch, The Machine is Us/Using Us

After reading Rosen and watching the video, go back to the last few seconds of the video where Wesch lists many social-cultural issues that we’ll need to reconsider. Thinking about the article, the video, and your own relationships with new media technologies, I’d like you to come up with a list of 7 – 10 other issues that you think we need to also reconsider and write a few sentences on why. Bring this to class so it can be discussed.

If you do not yet have a Twitter account, please sign up for one at http://twitter.com. Twitter works best (especially for our purposes) when the username is professional and you are authentic. For example, my username is: billwolff (http://twitter.com/billwolff), and I use my full name to show who I am. My account is unlocked. Please sign up with a professional username, use your real name, and keep your account unlocked. We’ll be using Twitter in a professional way so there is no need to keep anything private. Make sure you have your username with you for the first day.

If you do not have a WordPress account, I’d like you to sign up for one at: https://signup.wordpress.com/signup/?user=1. You must use this address; if you are asked to create a blog URL you are in the wrong place. Do NOT click the sign up for a blog link. After you sign up and you’ll be asked to verify your email address (I suggest using your Rowan email); please do that. Have your username and the email address you used to create the account with you on the first day. It is vital that you sign up for this account before class on Tuesday; do not wait for the last minute. Class Tuesday will be fast-paced and there won’t be time to sign up for accounts.

Also, please read the syllabus and module description. The module schedule will be online by the start of class.

For Tuesday, April 2

Please watch and read the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings (Part 5: privacy).

The rough draft of your final project is due by class time. Please put a copy of your draft narrative and slides in your Intro to Writing Arts Dropbox folder. This will allow you to access it in class. It is vital that the draft is finished by class time as we will be working on editing it in class.

If you have questions, please let me know.

For Thursday, March 28

Please read the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings (Part 4: gaming, screen literacy, remix).

As part of our readings on our connections to Web 2.0, I would like you to stop using Facebook until after class Tuesday, April 2. That is, you are not allowed to log in to or interact with anyone on Facebook for one whole week. You do not need to delete your account, though it is fascinating what happens when you try to do so. So your friends don’t freak out, your last status update should read something like, “Quitting Facebook for a week as a class experiment” or something like that. Of course, you can just stop using it and see what the results are, as well. After your last update, you must log out.

If you do not have a Facebook account, I would like you to stop using another online space that you use often or stop using another technology that you regularly use (such as, text messaging). Twitter is not an option for quitting since we are using it for class. Talk with me after class about which you will stop using.

As a way to collaboratively record and share what we are thinking about being without Facebook, I’d like you to tweet whenever you think about going to Facebook (or that other technology) and tweet what you are thinking/feeling. @reply to each other as often as possible. Add the #tfws13 hashtag to all these tweets.

Compose one blog post in which you discuss what it has been like to be without Facebook (or the other technology). How has it impacted you as an individual? As a member of a group of friends? As a student? And so on. Also think about it in terms of who you are as a professional. This post will take the place of one of your required weekly posts. It is due any time during the week of April 2.

Note: this assignment is adapted from one originated by @academicdave.

For Tuesday, March 26

Please watch and interact with the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings (Part 3: 2006 – 2011). Continue blogging and tweeting. Start the part 2 of the Twitter assignment.Since we didn’t get a change to go over the Pecha Kucha assignment, please spend some time going over it. We’ll talk about it when we get back from break.

No blogging or tweeting is required during Spring Break. Have a fun and safe break!

For Thursday, March 14

Please the read the essays listed under Web 2.0 Readings (Part 2: 1999 – 2005). For the essay by Selfe, read only pages 10 – 15 under the heading, “What is Technological Literacy?” Be prepared to discuss these readings and the ones for Tuesday in terms of themes that run through them.

Continue blogging and begin the Twitter assignment. If you are unsure of what to do when live-tweeting, I encourage you to see the tweets that students in #inarchs13 are tweeting. Use these as an example.

For Tuesday, March 12

Please the read the essays listed under Web 2.0 Readings (Part 1: 1945 – 1996).

For “As We May Think” by V. Bush, only read the Introduction and sections 1, 3, 6, 7, and 8. This is a complex piece. Pay close attention to how Bush is discussing the central problem of the day (the day being 1945)—how to handle the huge amounts of information now available—and his solution in the Mimex. Here is a diagram of the Mimex, which was published in Life magazine soon after the Atlantic Monthly article appeared:

There is no set prompt to respond to the readings. Rather, begin blogging about the readings as discussed in the Blogging assignment.

Please also read an essay by Atwood and a blog post by Silver, which discuss Twitter. We’ll be starting to use Twitter on Tuesday. All readings on the Readings page.

For Thursday, March 7

Please spend some time looking around the Dashboard of your brand new exciting wonderful totally cool group blog. (That is, if we’ve gotten them set up that far in class on Tuesday.)

Then, read the two essays by Bolter (see the Readings page) and compose a 400 – 500 word response to it in which you are sure to quote the text and connect Bolter’s ideas on writing and writing technologies to something in your own lives.

Please bring a copy in electronic form to class. You can email it to yourself, put it on a USB drive, or other way of having it digitally. No need to print it out or send it to BW. This response will become your first blog post.

Please also read the blog post by VanFlossen (see Readings page) discussing the difference between WordPress blog categories and tags.

For Tuesday, March 5 | First Day of Module 2

The assignment for the first meeting of the module will start us thinking about the main goal of the module: considering how the writing and social connections afforded by Web 2.0 technologies are transforming our understanding of a host of important social, political, economic, and rhetorical issues. Please read Rosen (2012) (on the Readings page) and watch this video:

Michael Wesch, The Machine is Us/Using Us

After reading Rosen and watching the video, go back to the last few seconds of the video where Wesch lists many social-cultural issues that we’ll need to reconsider. Thinking about the article, the video, and your own relatonships with new media technologies, I’d like you to come up with a list of 7 – 10 other issues that you think we need to also reconsider and write a few sentences on why. Bring this to class so it can be discussed.

If you do not yet have a Twitter account, please sign up for one at http://twitter.com. Twitter works best (especially for our purposes) when the username is professional and you are authentic. For example, my username is: billwolff (http://twitter.com/billwolff), and I use my full name to show who I am. My account is unlocked. Please sign up with a professional username, use your real name, and keep your account unlocked. We’ll be using Twitter in a professional way so there is no need to keep anything private. Make sure you have your username with you for the first day.

If you do not have a WordPress account, I’d like you to sign up for one at: https://signup.wordpress.com/signup/?user=1. You must use this address; if you are asked to create a blog URL you are in the wrong place. Do NOT click the sign up for a blog link. After you sign up and you’ll be asked to verify your email address (I suggest using your Rowan email); please do that. Have your username and the email address you used to create the account with you on the first day.

Also, please read the syllabus and module description. The module schedule will be online by the start of class.

For Tuesday, February 26

Please watch and read the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings (Part 5: privacy).

The rough draft of your final project is due by class time. Please put a copy of your draft narrative and slides in your Intro to Writing Arts Dropbox folder. This will allow you to access it in class. It is vital that the draft is finished by class time as we will be working on editing it in class.

If you have questions, please let me know. Note that my wife may be out of town this weekend, which means that I’ll have @ouryoungster by myself. This means my email and Twitter access will be limited. So, it may take longer than usual to get back.

For Thursday, February 21

Please read the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings (Part 4: gaming, screen literacy, remix).

Continue blogging and tweeting! Don’t forget the Facebook blog post is due by the end of this week. See below for details.

For Tuesday, February 19

Please watch and interact with the texts in the Web 2.0 Readings (Part 3: 2006 – 2011). Continue blogging and tweeting. Start the part 2 of the Twitter assignment.

As part of our readings on our connections to Web 2.0, I would like you to stop using Facebook until after class Thursday, February 21. That is, you are not allowed to log in to or interact with anyone on Facebook for one whole week. You do not need to delete your account, though it is fascinating what happens when you try to do so. So your friends don’t freak out, your last status update should read something like, “Quitting Facebook for a week as a class experiment” or something like that. Of course, you can just stop using it and see what the results are, as well. After your last update, you must log out.

If you do not have a Facebook account, I would like you to stop using another online space that you use often or stop using another technology that you regularly use (such as, text messaging). Twitter is not an option for quitting since we are using it for class. Talk with me after class about which you will stop using.

As a way to collaboratively record and share what we are thinking about being without Facebook, I’d like you to tweet whenever you think about going to Facebook (or that other technology) and tweet what you are thinking/feeling. @reply to each other as often as possible. Add the #tfws13 hashtag to all these tweets.

Compose one blog post in which you discuss what it has been like to be without Facebook (or the other technology). How has it impacted you as an individual? As a member of a group of friends? As a student? And so on. Also think about it in terms of who you are as a professional. This post will take the place of one of your required weekly posts.

Note: this assignment is adapted from one originated by @academicdave.

For Thursday, February 14

Please the read the essays listed under Web 2.0 Readings (Part 2: 1999 – 2005). For the essay by Selfe, read only pages 10 – 15 under the heading, “What is Technological Literacy?” Be prepared to discuss these readings and the ones for Tuesday in terms of themes that run through them.

Continue blogging and begin the Twitter assignment.

For Tuesday, February 12

Please the read the essays listed under Web 2.0 Readings (Part 1: 1945 – 1996).

For “As We May Think” by V. Bush, only read the Introduction and sections 1, 3, 6, 7, and 8. This is a complex piece. Pay close attention to how Bush is discussing the central problem of the day (the day being 1945)—how to handle the huge amounts of information now available—and his solution in the Mimex. Here is a diagram of the Mimex, which was published in Life magazine soon after the Atlantic Monthly article appeared:

There is no set prompt to respond to the readings. Rather, begin blogging about the readings as discussed in the Blogging assignment.

Please also read an essay by Atwood and a blog post by Silver, which discuss Twitter. We’ll be starting to use Twitter on Tuesday. All readings on the Readings page.

For Tuesday, January 29

The assignment for the first meeting of the module will start us thinking about the main goal of the module: considering how the writing and social connections afforded by Web 2.0 technologies are transforming our understanding of a host of important social, political, economic, and rhetorical issues. Please read Rosen (2012) and watch this video:

Michael Wesch, The Machine is Us/Using Us

After reading Rosen and watching the video, go back to the last few seconds of the video where Wesch lists many social-cultural issues that we’ll need to reconsider. Thinking about the article, the video, and your own relatonships with new media technologies, I’d like you to come up with a list of 7 – 10 other issues that you think we need to also reconsider and write a few sentences on why. Bring this to class so it can be discussed.

If you do not yet have a Twitter account, please sign up for one at http://twitter.com. Twitter works best (especially for our purposes) when the username is professional and you are authentic. For example, my username is: billwolff (http://twitter.com/billwolff), and I use my full name to show who I am. My account is unlocked. Please sign up with a professional username, use your real name, and keep your account unlocked. We’ll be using Twitter in a professional way so there is no need to keep anything private. Make sure you have your username with you for the first day.

If you do not have a WordPress account, I’d like you to sign up for one at: https://signup.wordpress.com/signup/?user=1. You must use this address; if you are asked to create a blog URL you are in the wrong place. Do NOT click the sign up for a blog link. After you sign up and you’ll be asked to verify your email address (I suggest using your Rowan email); please do that. Have your username and the email address you used to create the account with you on the first day.

Also, please read the syllabus and module description. There may be some minor changes up to classtime on Tuesday.

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